The Truth on Fitness

Cardio

The Cybex Research Institute, under the guidance of Dr. Paul Juris, has the directive of discovering the scientific truths that verify the information disseminated to the fitness community and the products engineered by Cybex International. In this section, "The Truth on Fitness", the Institute will examine a variety of pertinent fitness topics, and present credible basic science and evidence-based conclusions that will help our readers make smart decisions about their own fitness methods and practices. To learn more about the truth on fitness, click on a link below.

Truth on Fitness: Insights on the barefoot running trend

Barefoot running is becoming an increasingly popular trend as of late. Minimal or near-barefoot style shoes (e.g., Nike Free, Vibram FiveFingers) have significantly increased sales while barefoot-like running techniques (e.g., Pose,Chi) are commonly touted as the correct or ‘natural’ way to run. Many proponents of barefoot running claim we were ‘born to run’ and that modern day running shoes are the main cause of the high injury rates experienced by runners (McDougall 2009). Are shoes to blame for all running injuries?

The Truth on Fitness: Should Women Run?

Should women run? This is the question that was recently posed on a popular internet sports conditioning forum. Citing a review article published in the journal Sports Medicine, and a vague reference to women's structural anatomy, the commentator questioned whether women should run. To read the rebuttal presented by Dr. Paul Juris, click on the title above.

The Truth on Fitness: Is Treadmill Running The Equivalent Of Running Over Ground?

When running on a treadmill, "the belt pulls your leg through, resulting in a relatively passive extension of the hip. Passive [hip] extension would then minimize the contribution of the primary hip extensors. Running over ground, on the other hand, requires that you pull your leg through, therefore involving active hip extension."

The Truth on Fitness: Strength = Cardio

In considering fitness programs, two broad categories typically define one's exercise options; strength training, or cardiovascular conditioning. Most of us understand, intuitively, the differences between these modes of exercise, and organize our workouts so that they are treated separately. In fact, most gym environments divide the equipment serving these two modalities. From a different perspective, however, strength training and cardiovascular conditioning are really one in the same, with equipment options that blur the lines between the two applications.